Three Billboards

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI - Official Red Band Trailer - FOX Searchlight

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI is a darkly comic drama from Academy Award winner Martin McDonagh (IN BRUGES). After months have passed without a culprit in her daughter’s murder case, Mildred Hayes (Academy Award winner Frances McDormand) makes a bold move, painting three signs leading into her town with a controversial message directed at William Willoughby (Academy Award nominee Woody Harrelson), the town’s revered chief of police. When his second-in-command Officer Dixon (Sam Rockwell), an immature mother’s boy with a penchant for violence, gets involved, the battle between Mildred and Ebbing’s law enforcement is only exacerbated.

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List-Construction as a Task and Resource

The occurrence of lists in natural conversation is examined to reveal some of the interactional relevances of such list productions.

The presence of three-part lists are first noted. Speakers and hearers orient to their three-part nature. The complete list can then constitute a turn at talk and the hearer can monitor the third component as a sign of turn completion.  List can thereby be a conversational sequential source.

By virtue of the three-part structure of some lists, members can orient to such matters as a “weak”, “absent”, or “missing” third part. Third items can be used to accomplish particular interactional work, such as topic-shifting and offense avoidance.

This report is a preliminary examination of lists occurring in natural conversation.

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How is what3words able to provide accurate address of every location?

With what3words, Chris Sheldrick and his team have divided the entire planet into three-meter squares and assigned each a unique, three-word identifier, like famous.splice.writers or blocks.evenly.breed, giving a precise address to the billions of people worldwide who don’t have one. In this quick talk about a big idea, Sheldrick explains the economic and political implications of giving everyone an accurate address — from building infrastructure to sending aid to disaster zones to delivering hot pizza.

We have named every 3mx3m in the world with unique combination of 3 words.

Geospatial Start up of the Year is valuable recognition for What3Words.

The Idea behind what3words was to use words 3 words as it is easy for people to grasp.

We use latitude and longitude with our algorithm to generate 3 words addressing.

We do not use any address or pass code or anything which is much bigger then 3 meters.

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3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths – and shows the Greeks did not develop trigonometry

plimpton 322 tablet
plimpton 322 tablet

3,700-year-old clay tablet has proven that the Babylonians developed trigonometry 1,500 years before the Greeks and were using a sophisticated method of mathematics which could change how we calculate today.

The tablet, known as Plimpton 332, was discovered in the early 1900s in Southern Iraq by the American archaeologist and diplomat Edgar Banks, who was the inspiration for Indiana Jones.

The true meaning of the tablet has eluded experts until now but new research by the University of New South Wales, Australia, has shown it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, which was probably used by ancient architects to construct temples, palaces and canals. Continue reading 3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths – and shows the Greeks did not develop trigonometry

Micro-Moments Now: 3 new consumer behaviors playing out in Google search data

By Lisa Gevelber Jul 2017 Mobile, Search, Micro-Moments  

Mobile Search
Mobile Search

People’s search behavior is evolving and their expectations are becoming clear. Google’s VP of Marketing for the Americas Lisa Gevelber gives a glimpse of the consumer taking shape behind the data.

  1. The “well-advised” consumer
  2. The “right here” consumer
  3. The “right now” consumer

Two years ago, Google introduced the concept of micro-moments. We put a name to a behavior that, thanks to mobile, was becoming pervasive. People had started to expect an immediate answer in the moments they wanted to know, go, do, and buy. The concept of micro-moments was perhaps as truthful, observable, and relatable a consumer behavior trend as any marketer could wish for.

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TREE[3]

Professor Tony Padilla on the epic number, TREE(3). Continues at: https://youtu.be/IihcNa9YAPk

Some math conjectures and theorems and proofs can take on a profound, quasi-religious status as examples of the limits of human comprehension. TREE(3) is one of those examples.

“You’ve got all these physical processes going on in the universe all around you. None of them are anything compared to TREE(3),” says University of Nottingham mathmatics professor Tony Padilla in a new episode of the wonderful YouTube series Numberphile.

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Socrates 

Socrates
Socrates

 “Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people.”

“If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality.”

 “I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.”

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us”

Why Do We Have Middle Names?

BY THE MAG ,BY SEAN HUTCHINSON

AUGUST 26, 2014

Forename, middle name, surname. 

Middle names
Middle names

The phrase “middle name” first appeared in an 1835 Harvard University periodical called Harvardiana, but the practice dates back much further.

In ancient Rome, having multiple names was an honor usually bestowed upon the most important people—like Gaius Julius Caesar. The fad died out only to pick back up again in Western cultures in the 1700s, when aristocrats started giving their children lavishly long names to indicate their place in society. Similarly, lengthy Spanish and Arabic names adopt paternal or maternal names from previous generations to trace the individual’s family tree. (In other cultures, like Chinese, there are traditionally no middle names.)
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Phantom Time Hypothesis

ACCORDING TO THE PHANTOM TIME HYPOTHESIS, CHARLEMAGNE NEVER EXISTED, ALONG WITH 297 YEARS THAT WERE JUST MADE UP.

Bizarre Theory Says It’s Actually The Year 1720 Because The Early Middle Ages Were Faked

Holy Roman Emperor Otto III
Holy Roman Emperor Otto III

In 1991, Illig proposed his theory, aptly called the Phantom Time Hypothesis. He claims there was conspiracy entered into back in 1000 AD to change the dating system by three world rulers.

Illig claims that Pope Sylvester II, Holy Roman Emperor Otto III, and Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII all got together and changed the calendar to make it seem as if Otto had begun his reign in the millennial year of 1000 AD, rather than 996. The reason being that 1000 sounded a lot more meaningful than 996 considering AD stands for “anno domini,” or, “the year of the Lord.”
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