Socrates 

Socrates
Socrates

 “Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people.”

“If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality.”

 “I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.”

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us”

Why Do We Have Middle Names?

BY THE MAG ,BY SEAN HUTCHINSON

AUGUST 26, 2014

Forename, middle name, surname. 

Middle names
Middle names

The phrase “middle name” first appeared in an 1835 Harvard University periodical called Harvardiana, but the practice dates back much further.

In ancient Rome, having multiple names was an honor usually bestowed upon the most important people—like Gaius Julius Caesar. The fad died out only to pick back up again in Western cultures in the 1700s, when aristocrats started giving their children lavishly long names to indicate their place in society. Similarly, lengthy Spanish and Arabic names adopt paternal or maternal names from previous generations to trace the individual’s family tree. (In other cultures, like Chinese, there are traditionally no middle names.)
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Phantom Time Hypothesis

ACCORDING TO THE PHANTOM TIME HYPOTHESIS, CHARLEMAGNE NEVER EXISTED, ALONG WITH 297 YEARS THAT WERE JUST MADE UP.

Bizarre Theory Says It’s Actually The Year 1720 Because The Early Middle Ages Were Faked

Holy Roman Emperor Otto III
Holy Roman Emperor Otto III

In 1991, Illig proposed his theory, aptly called the Phantom Time Hypothesis. He claims there was conspiracy entered into back in 1000 AD to change the dating system by three world rulers.

Illig claims that Pope Sylvester II, Holy Roman Emperor Otto III, and Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII all got together and changed the calendar to make it seem as if Otto had begun his reign in the millennial year of 1000 AD, rather than 996. The reason being that 1000 sounded a lot more meaningful than 996 considering AD stands for “anno domini,” or, “the year of the Lord.”
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Pull the plug

Pull the plug
Pull the plug
1. Lit. to turn off someone’s life-support system in a hospital. (Based on pull the plug (on something) {2}. This results in the death of the person whose life support has been terminated.) They had to get a court order to pull the plug on their father. Fred signed a living will making it possible to pull the plug on him without a court order.

  1. Fig. to put an end to someone’s activities or plans. (Based on pull the plug (on something) {2}.) The mayor was doing a fine job until the treasurer pulled the plug on him. David pulled the plug on Fred, who was taking too long with the project.

pulling the strings

Pulling the strings
Pulling the strings

COMMON If someone pulls the strings, they control everything that another person or an organization does, often in a way that is not noticed by people. He engineered many of these political changes, pulling the strings from behind the stage. He is the kind of man who prefers to work behind the scenes, pulling the strings.

Note: The image here is of a puppet which is controlled by means of strings.

Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

Fish: Baked, Broiled, or Fried?

Does it matter how you cook your fish?

fishFish is a terrific source of lean protein. Cold water fish, especially salmon, provides heart healthy omega-3 fats in abundance. But does a fried fish burger provide the same heart protection as a grilled fillet of wild salmon? Let’s be honest. It would be a stretch to actually believe that a deep-fried battered hunk of seafood slathered in mayonnaise is remotely similar to a pristine cut of fresh fish. Nevertheless, perhaps goaded by their wishful patients, the question tempted the scientists studying the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). Now we have a clear and unequivocal answer: no.

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Pythagorean theorem

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Albert Einstein, and American President James A. Garfield have in common?

They all came up with elegant proofs for the famous Pythagorean theorem:

In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem, also known as Pythagoras’s theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle. It states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides.

What do Euclid, 12-year-old Albert Einstein, and American President James A. Garfield have in common?

Source:https://www.facebook.com/TEDEducation/videos/1742518602428005/

McCrabb: Bride hopes third-generation wedding dress remains lucky

Bride wears 3rd generation wedding dress for a lucky marriage like her grandmother, mother

Not only is Jordan Mitterholzer changing her name to Jordan Delgado when she gets married Saturday, but the business that altered her wedding dress — the same dress worn by her mother and grandmother — needs to change names, too.

Twice Blessed Bridal should be called Third Time Threads.

That’s because Mitterholzer, 23, of Dayton, will wear the same dress — with a few alterations, of course — that her grandmother, Jean Beckdahl, 87, wore on April 18, 1953 when she married Walter Beckdahl in Mansfield and her mother, Lynn Mitterholzer, 57, wore on Sept. 19, 1981 when she married Doug Mitterholzer in Springfield.

Continue reading McCrabb: Bride hopes third-generation wedding dress remains lucky

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